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Euphoria’s Maude Apatow and Angus Cloud Are Dating in New York

Taylor Johnston

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Fez And Lexi’s relationshipEuphoria“Is very pure, and as it turns out, with Angus Cloud Maude Apatow It’s also a cute pair off the screen.The co-star is Date night On February 13th, Cloud shared two photos with Apatow on Instagram Stories. “Dating in New York,” he captioned the photo with. Cloud also added “#Fexi” to refer to the ship name of the pair.Euphoria“letter.

In the Sunday episode, Fez and Lexie developed further while weeding together, talking about her play “Oklahoma,” and holding hands while listening to Ben E. King’s “Stand by Me.”Prior to Episode 5, Apatou shared some Behind-the-scenes photos, Including some in the cloud. “The love you made,” he commented. Meanwhile, her father Judd ApatowJoke in the comments section, “Is this something I should worry about?” It’s unclear if Apatow and Cloud are more than just friends. In any case, we are in love with their on-screen romance.

Euphoria’s Maude Apatow and Angus Cloud are dating in New York

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New Laws Going Into Effect January 1 Includes More Implementation on Fentanyl Bill

Taylor Johnston

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Twenty new laws are set to hit the books on Jan. 1, 2023. Here’s a look at what changes in the Colorado Revised Statutes.

House Bill 22-1025: Repeals eight tax breaks that have had little usefulness. The state will gain revenue from the repeals, to the tune of about $400,000 in fiscal year 2023-24. What those tax breaks include:

an income tax credit for investment in technologies for recycling plasticsan income tax credit for crop or livestock contributions to a charitable organization.

House Bill 1031: The consumer right to repair wheelchairs legislation requires manufacturers of power wheelchairs to supply documentation and parts to independent repair shops. Currently, it’s usually only the manufacturer that can conduct those repairs. Under the law, the manufacturer could face deceptive trade fines for refusing to supply the information or parts for those repairs.

House Bill 1043: Changes the definition of “autocycle” to distinguish it from a motorcycle. An autocycle, under the law, is a three-wheeled motor vehicle in which the driver and each passenger ride in a fully or partly enclosed seating area equipped with seat belts. Under the law, drivers of autocycles would not need a motorcycle endorsement on their drivers’ licenses and would no longer have to pay certain fees for motorcycle operator safety training.

House Bill 1067: Modifies the law around municipal bond hearings. Under the law, a municipal court must hold a bond hearing within 48 hours after receipt of notice that the defendant is being held only on a municipal hold. Under current law, municipal courts do not count Sundays or holidays for purposes of bond hearings; the law would include Sundays and holidays under that 48-hour requirement.

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House Bill 1099: One of the consumer protection laws from the 2022 session, this law requires online marketplaces that use third-party sellers to require those sellers to provide a bank account, contact information, business or individual tax ID number and a current email address and phone number. The law also requires online marketplaces to suspend the accounts of third-party sellers that refuse to provide or keep current their information, and the online dealer must verify that the information is correct. The law applies to third-party sellers with at least $20,000 per year in annual gross revenues.

House Bill 1254: Cracks down on people who move to Colorado and don’t register their motor vehicles in a timely manner. Under the law, those who fail to register within 90 days will be assessed late fees and be required to pay back taxes and fees. Current law requires residents to register vehicles within 60 days of purchase or within 90 days of becoming a Colorado resident. The Department of Revenue already assesses a $25 per month penalty once that 90 days has expired without vehicle registration, to a maximum of $100. The law adds back-dated taxes and fees that begin with the date the person becomes a Colorado resident.

Portions of House Bill 1326, the controversial measure dealing with fentanyl, also go into effect on Jan. 1. The most significant change is that on Jan. 1, a county jail that receive funding for jail-based behavioral health services programs must develop and publish a policy on or before Jan. 1 that describes how it will handle medication-assisted treatment and other appropriate withdrawal management care upon a person’s release from jail. The Department of Public Health and Environment is also required to contract with a third party that will develop an independent study on the implementation of HB 1326 by Jan. 1. That study will look at data on criminal charges filed tied to fentanyl and certain other drugs, the disposition of the case, if the defendant served time in jail or prison and whether that defendant received substance abuse treatment; age, gender and race of the defendant and whether the defendant was represented by a court-appointed attorney, a determinant of income.

Managed care organizations have new responsibilities as of Jan. 1 from HB 1326, including providing short-term residential placements for withdrawal management, crisis stabilization or medication-assisted treatment for those in immediate need of detox services.

Jan. 1 also marks the date that emergency service providers, emergency departments, state and local law enforcement, sheriffs, and coroners may participate in a web-based overdose detection mapping application program. That program would track incidences of fatal and non-fatal drug overdoses. Participation in the mapping program, however, is voluntary, not mandatory.

Senate Bill 204: Current law allows the Department of Revenue to issue a driver’s license, instruction permit, or identification card to a person who is lawfully present in the United States if the person qualifies for the ID, produces documents that satisfies the department’s requirement that the person is lawfully present, or if the federal government confirms the person’s status. SB 204 removes the federal government provision.


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Coroner Spotlights Domestic Violence, Homelessness, Fentanyl Crises in Annual Report

Taylor Johnston

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More than a third of the 61 people murdered in El Paso County last year were killed during a domestic or family violence situation.

Seven homeless people froze to death on the streets of Colorado Springs last year, and another five died from exposure to the elements from Jan. 1 through May 31 of this year.

And while youth suicides declined dramatically last year, more adolescents as well as adults are unintentionally dying from fentanyl, according to the 2021 El Paso County Coroner’s annual investigative-deaths report, released Tuesday.

“As our population grows, we’d expect to see all categories increase incrementally, but there are areas where we’ve left that trajectory,” said Dr. Leon Kelly, El Paso County coroner and chief medical examiner.

Fentanyl, a prescription pain drug, constitutes a “gross deviation” from predicted increases, Kelly said, largely because the synthetic opioid has wormed its way into many illicit street pills and often is ingested unknowingly.

That’s evidenced by the number of fentanyl-related deaths doubling for each of the past five years, he said.

Last year’s five accidental fentanyl-related deaths among children younger than age 18 surpassed the number of teen suicides last year, which fell from a record-tying high of 15 deaths in 2020 to only four deaths in 2021, statistics show.

“The big tipping point came when fentanyl went from an illegally trafficked drug to being stamped and masked as other medications,” Kelly said. “It’s easily carried, sold to kids in pills, and the cost has gone down because of the massive supply, so the barrier has been broken.”

Across the board, accidental drug-related deaths increased by 22% last year, with 107 methamphetamine deaths and 99 fentanyl deaths. Fentanyl also was found in a quarter of the meth overdoses.

Other trends that emerged from 2021 autopsied deaths:

o El Paso County saw a large increase in total firearms-related fatalities, jumping from 133 in 2020 to 167 last year.

o Homicides increased from 55 in 2020 to 61 in 2021, six of which occurred in a single mass-shooting event at a family gathering on Mother’s Day last year.

o The average age of the 78 people who died while homeless was 49 years old. Deaths of homeless during the first five months of this year are outpacing last year, with 48 deaths through through May 31.

o At least one military veteran or active-duty service member died by suicide every week in El Paso County last year.

o 58 people died in motor vehicle accidents, a decrease from 78 in 2020.

o However, 20 pedestrians and five bicyclists were killed in 2021, compared with 13 pedestrians and seven bicyclists in 2020.

o There were an additional 96 accidental deaths due to falls predominantly among the elderly, with an average age of 78.6 years, which were investigated without autopsy.

o 398 people died of natural causes, with cardiovascular disease as the top reason, causing 170 deaths, and chronic alcoholism attributed to 64 deaths.

The same type of prevention work that El Paso County has poured into reducing teen suicides needs to be deployed to counter the use of fentanyl, Kelly said.

Efforts are underway, he said, with the 4th Judicial District Attorney’s Office convening community leaders and experts to study lessons learned from youth suicide prevention that can be applied in attacking the newest threat to children’s lives.

Success in lessening youth suicides came because representatives from all sectors became part of a concerted push, Kelly said, after El Paso County ranked highest in the state and near the top in the nation for self-inflicted fatalities.

“Every conceivable youth-facing organization, from faith-based, to Inside Out (a lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender organization that serves youth), to schools, to parents to law enforcement to mental health professionals identifying what was going on and what they could bring to the table,” Kelly said.

Face It Together, a nonprofit that provides peer coaching for adults with addictions and support for families, has seen “a great need” and an increase in people seeking help with opioid addiction such as fentanyl, said CEO Wendy White.

The organization opened its first Colorado office last April in Colorado Springs and also offers remote services nationwide.

“The power of using peers helps remove the shame and stigma, and breaks down barriers, allowing people to share their situation and add more tools to their toolbox,” White said.

She said she’d like to see a “harm-reduction” approach with test strips provided for drug users to determine the toxicity level of pills they might ingest.

The public now can buy Narcan, an antidote for people overdosing on opioids, at pharmacies without a prescription, said Dr. Eric Stein Bronsky, an emergency medicine physician with Penrose-St. Francis Health Services in Colorado Springs. Emergency medical technicians and police also carry doses, which is easily administered in a nasal spray, he said.

Also, hospitals dispense Narcan when discharging patients who are on pain medication, Bronsky said.

“Not all opiate doses are illegal; a tremendous amount of overdoses come from prescribed medication, and Grandma or Mom or Dad stacking pain medicine, or their body having a harsher response that can send them into respiratory decline,” he said.

Because fentanyl is hidden in pain pills that look like OxyContin or Percocet, for example, and is more potent than other drugs, opiate abuse won’t abate, Bronsky believes, until it’s seen as a health care crisis and not a legal problem.

“They can arrest more dealers, put more people in jail, but until we’re willing to concentrate on what it is — a health care crisis — people won’t be willing to solve it,” he said. “People are willing to solve a health care crisis.”


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Defense Contractor With 200-person Office in Colorado Springs Approves Company Merger

Taylor Johnston

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Vectrus shareholders approved a merger with The Vertex Co. to create the new military powerhouse, V2X, a $3.4 billion revenue company to be based out of northern Virginia, Vectrus announced in a news release Wednesday.

The transaction will give Vertex shareholders nearly two-thirds ownership of the company and Vectrus shareholders one third, creating one of the nation’s 20 largest defense contractors with 14,000 employees in 300 locations worldwide.

“Today’s (Wednesday’s) overwhelming approval marks a significant step toward completing our merger with Vertex, and creating one of the leading providers of critical mission solutions and support to defense clients globally,” Chief Executive Officer of Vectrus Chuck Prow said in the release. “Vectrus and Vertex — together as V2X — will be better positioned to meet the mission-essential needs of our clients while delivering cost efficiencies, increased security and resiliency, with more strategic use of resources.”

The melding of the two companies is likely save about $20 million a year by eliminating duplicated information technology, computer networks along with “some consolidation of people,” as V2X tries to tackles a contract backlog of more than $11 billion reaching into 2027.

Vectrus’ Colorado Springs office of 200 employees that focuses on sales, finance and human resources will stay in place, Vectrus Vice President Michael Smith confirmed.

Vertex also operates an office near the Colorado Springs Airport that supports a contract the company manages at a radar station in Alaska that feeds data to the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD).

Summer jobs help area youths earn cash, develop skills

Prow will become CEO, Vectrus Chief Financial Officer Susan Lynch will hold the same post in the combined company and Vectrus board members will hold six of the 11 seats on the combined board, including the chairman’s post. Vertex CEO Ed Boyington will serve on the board and remain with the combined company until retiring after an unspecified transition period.

Vectrus, which specializes in logistics, information technology maintenance and operating military bases, is slightly larger than Vertex.

Vectrus generates about $190 million more in revenue and employs 2,400 more people, mostly at military bases around the world. Vertex specializes in aircraft maintenance, systems engineering and training.

“We thank all of our stakeholders for their continued support and look forward to completing the pending combination so we can begin unlocking the incredible potential of our combined platform,” Prow said.


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